Modern day RPG video games dialogue versus old movies

Thread starter #1
Why oh why they don’t make it memorable and endearing like this scene from Braveheart... not that there aren’t any, but they are rare.

 
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Najwalaylah

Exalted Member
Why oh why they don’t make it memorable and endearing like this scene from Braveheart... not that there aren’t any, but they are rare.

The snappy answer is that the dialogue of RPGs you find lacking are probably written by people unfamiliar with history, literature, drama, psychology, or even full sentences-- especially those of the latter that do not depend on emoji or image memes to convey their meaning-- and possibly as an afterthought.

(Those deficits would come even before someone in a suit decides

figure one: this shit killed SWG
too-much-reading-and-creation.png

that too much reading might be going on and puts the text of the game through a Readability Filter to estimate a grade level (usually based on American school system) required to have partial or complete understanding of it, based on syllable count, word count, sentence length, et cetera. You get an end product geared toward the <strikeout>average</strikeout> <ins>mediocre</ins> rather than the exceptional-- in other words, most of your favourite, memorable, and endearing dialogue from old movies wouldn't make it through the process.)

What do you think?
 
Thread starter #3
The snappy answer is that the dialogue of RPGs you find lacking are probably written by people unfamiliar with history, literature, drama, psychology, or even full sentences-- especially those of the latter that do not depend on emoji or image memes to convey their meaning-- and possibly as an afterthought.

(Those deficits would come even before someone in a suit decides

figure one: this shit killed SWG
View attachment 12573
that too much reading might be going on and puts the text of the game through a Readability Filter to estimate a grade level (usually based on American school system) required to have partial or complete understanding of it, based on syllable count, word count, sentence length, et cetera. You get an end product geared toward the <strikeout>average</strikeout> <ins>mediocre</ins> rather than the exceptional-- in other words, most of your favourite, memorable, and endearing dialogue from old movies wouldn't make it through the process.)

What do you think?
It pains me to read the reasoning they give behind dumbing down or bastardising character dialogue interactions.

I think much of the ones I’ve seen in modern RPG video games exhibit a stale and cliched monotony that doesn’t make you think deeper about the characters, you don’t feel the passion and conviction they feel, and the dialogue is little more than a vehicle to drive the story forward.

Even when they do try to bring some kind of emotion or personality to the characters, it feels forced or unnatural.

There are some exceptional titles that break from this mould, and have dialogue moments I still remember and replay them in my mind every now and then, like The Witcher 3 and Kingdom Come Deliverance.

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